Judas Priest - 'Screaming For Vengeance' 30th Anniversary Edition

 

CD:
1.) "The Hellion"
2.) "Electric Eye"
3.) "Riding on the Wind"
4.) "Bloodstone"
5.) "(Take These) Chains"
6.) "Pain and Pleasure"
7.) "Screaming for Vengeance"
8.) "You"ve Got Another Thing Coming"
9.) "Fever"
10.) "Devil"s Child"
bonus tracks:
11.) "Electric Eye" (live)
12.) "Riding on the Wind" (live)
13.) "You"ve Got Another Thing Coming" (live)
14.) "Screaming for Vengeance" (live)
15.) "Devil"s Child" (live)
16.) "Prisoner of Your Eyes"

DVD:
'US Festival Show – San Bernardino, Calif. May 29, 1983
1.) "Electric Eye"
2.) "Riding on the Wind"
3.) "Heading Out to the Highway"
4.) "Metal Gods"
5.) "Breaking the Law"
6.) "Diamonds and Rust"
7.) "Victim of Changes"
8.) "Living After Midnight"
9.) "The Green Manalishi (With the Two-Pronged Crown)"
10.) "Screaming for Vengeance"
11.) "You"ve Got Another Thing Coming"
12.) "Hell Bent for Leather"

 

Judas Priest line ups:
(September 1969-April 1970)
Al Atkins - lead vocals
Ernie Chataway - lead guitar
Bruno Stapenhill - bass
John Partridge - drums
(October 1970-6 October 1971)
Al Atkins - lead vocals

K. K. Downing - lead guitar

Ian Hill - bass

John Ellis - drums
(October–December 1971)
Al Atkins - lead vocals

K. K. Downing - lead guitar

Ian Hill - bass

Alan Moore - drums
(December 1971–May 1973)
Al Atkins - lead vocals

K. K. Downing - lead guitar

Ian Hill - bass

Chris Campbell - drums
(May 1973–April 1974)
Rob Halford - lead vocals

K. K. Downing - lead guitar

Ian Hill - bass

John Hinch - drums
(April 1974–1975)
Rob Halford - lead vocals

K. K. Downing - lead guitar

Glenn Tipton - lead guitar, keyboards, backing vocals

Ian Hill - bass

John Hinch - drums
(1975–1976)
Rob Halford - vocals

K. K. Downing - guitar

Glenn Tipton - guitar, keyboards

Ian Hill - bass

Alan Moore - drums

 

(1977)
Rob Halford - vocals

K. K. Downing - guitar

Glenn Tipton - guitar, keyboards

Ian Hill - bass

With
Simon Phillips - drums on Sin After Sin (session player)
(1977–1979)
Rob Halford - lead vocals

K. K. Downing - guitar

Glenn Tipton - guitar, backing vocals

Ian Hill - bass

Les Binks - drums
(1979–1989)
Rob Halford - vocals

K. K. Downing - guitar

Glenn Tipton - guitar

Ian Hill - bass

Dave Holland - drums

Discography: from '74-'82
'Rocka Rolla' (1974)

'Sad Wings of Destiny' (1976)

'Sin After Sin' (1977)

'Stained Class' (1978)

'Killing Machine' / 'Hell Bent for Leather' (1978)

'British Steel' (1980)

'Point of Entry' (1981)

'Screaming for Vengeance' (1982)



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------bio goes up to just 'Screaming For Vengeance'  release-------------------------------------------------------------------------
K. K. Downing, Ian Hill, and John Ellis had known each other since early childhood growing up on the Yew Tree estate in West Bromwich. They attended Churchfields Sch. at All Saints in W. Bromwich. Downing and Hill became close friends in their early teens, when they shared similar musical interests (Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Cream, The Yardbirds) and learned to play instruments. The band was founded in October 1970 in Birmingham, West Midlands, England, after a local ensemble named Judas Priest (from Bob Dylan's song "The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest") disbanded.
Al Atkins approached Downing and Hill, who were playing as the power trio Freight, with drummer Ellis (born 19 September 1951, Yew Tree Estate, West Bromwich, Staffordshire) and asked if he could become their singer. With Atkins in the band, he suggested they change their name to Judas Priest. The original Judas Priest had formed in early September 1969 by Al Atkins (lead vocals) and Bruno Stapenhill (bass, born Brian Stapenhill, in 1948, Stone Cross, W. Bromwich), with lead guitar player Ernie Chataway (born Ernest Chataway, in 1952, in Winson Green, Birmingham, Warwickshire) and drummer John Partridge (born c. 1948, W. Bromwich). Stappenhill came up with the name Judas Priest and they rehearsed at his house in Stone Cross. The band played their first gig on 25 November 1969 at The George Hotel in Walsall, Staffordshire and then toured Scotland in December 1969 and January 1970. This band split in April 1970 after their last gig on 20 April at The Youth Centre in Cannock, Staffordshire. Atkins met the next line-up of Judas Priest at a church called St. James in Wednesbury, near W. Bromwich. This place was called Holy Joe's by the locals and here Atkins met lead guitarist Kenny Downing, bassist Ian 'Skull' Hill, and drummer John Ellis. They had a band called Freight (April–October 1970) and were looking for a singer; they agreed to join with Atkins, who suggested using his old band's name Judas Priest. They rehearsed at Atkins, mother-in-law's house in Stone Cross. The new line-up of Atkins, Downing, Hill, and Ellis played their first gig on 16 March 1971 at St John's Hall, Essington, S. Staffordshire.
With Downing as acting leader, the band moved away from their original blues influences to play hard rock. This quartet played around Birmingham and the surrounding areas with various drummers until 1974, sometimes opening for bands such as Budgie, Thin Lizzy, and Trapeze. Eventually, financial difficulties and problems with their management, Tony Iommi's company, IMA, led to the departure of Alan Atkins and drummer Alan Moore in May 1973.
At the time, Ian Hill was dating a woman from the nearby town of Walsall who suggested her brother, Rob Halford, be considered as a singer. Halford joined the band, bringing drummer John Hinch from his previous band, Hiroshima. This line-up toured the UK, often supporting Budgie, and even headlining some shows in Norway and Germany.
Before the band entered the studio to record their first album, their record company suggested they add another musician to the line-up. As Downing was reluctant to incorporate a keyboard or horn player into the band, he chose another lead guitarist, Glenn Tipton in April 1974, from the Stafford-based Flying Hat Band as their new member. The two guitarists worked together to adapt the existing material and Tipton also received credits as a song writer. In August 1974, the band released their debut single "Rocka Rolla" and followed this a month later with an album of the same name.
Technical problems during the recording contributed to the poor sound quality of the record. Producer Rodger Bain, whose CV included Black Sabbath's first three albums as well as Budgie's first album, dominated the production of the album and made decisions with which the band did not agree.  Bain also chose to leave fan favourites from the band's live set, such as "Tyrant", "Genocide" and "The Ripper", off the album and he cut the song "Caviar and Meths" from a 10-minute song down to a 2-minute instrumental.
The band participated more in the production of their next album, recorded during January and February 1976, and chose the producers themselves. The result, 'Sad Wings of Destiny' (1976), included a variety of old material, including the aforementioned stage favorites and the epic "Victim of Changes". This song was a combination of "Whiskey Woman", a stage classic from the Al Atkins' era of Judas Priest, and "Red Light Lady", a song that Halford had written with his previous group, Hiroshima. This album and a strong performance at the 1975 Reading Festival helped to raise wider interest in the band and extend their fanbase.
For their next album, 1977's 'Sin After Sin', produced by ex-Deep Purple bass player Roger Glover, the band chose to use session drummer Simon Phillips for the recordings. For the following tour Les (James Leslie) Binks played with the band, who were impressed with his performance and asked him to stay. Together they recorded 1978's 'Stained Class' and 'Killing Machine' (released in America as 'Hell Bent for Leather'). Binks, credited with writing the very powerful "Beyond the Realms of Death", was an accomplished and technically skilled drummer and his addition added a dexterous edge to the band's sound. Binks also played on 'Unleashed in the East', which was recorded live in Japan during the 'Killing Machine tour'. Compared with previous records 'Killing Machine' had shorter songs with increased commercial appeal while still retaining the band's heavy metal punch. At about the same time, the band members adopted their now-famous "leather-and-studs" image
Following the release of 'Killing Machine' was the live release from the supporting tour, entitled 'Unleashed in the East'. It was the first of many Judas Priest albums to go Platinum. At the time, there was some criticism of the band's use of studio-enhancements and overdubbing in what was marketed as a live album.
After Les Binks quit, in part because of the band's direction, the band replaced him with Dave Holland, formerly from the band Trapeze. With this line-up, Judas Priest recorded six studio and one live album which garnered different degrees of critical and financial success.
In 1980, the band released British Steel. The songs were shorter and had more mainstream radio hooks, but retained the heavy metal feel. Tracks such as "United", "Breaking the Law", and "Living After Midnight" were frequently played on the radio. The next release, 1981's 'Point of Entry', followed the same formula, but critics generally panned it. However, the tour in support was successful with new songs such as "Solar Angels" and "Heading Out to the Highway".
The 1982 album 'Screaming for Vengeance' featured the song "You've Got Another Thing Comin'", which garnered strong US radio airplay. Songs such as "Electric Eye" and "Riding on the Wind" also appeared off this album, and proved to be popular live tracks. "(Take These) Chains" (by Bob Halligan, Jr) was released as a single and received heavy airplay. This album went two times Platinum.
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    In 1984, After my mother's passing I went to go live with my father.  He live behind a 5 & 10 store called Ben Franklin.  Which had a Radio Shack section that carried vinyl LP's.  As I was flipping through the albums I came across the Judas Priest  L.P. 'Screaming For Vengeance'.  I did then as I do now  I put the album on and lay down so the music can absorb me.  Up to that point in heavy metal there had not been such a twin lead guitar arsenal such as KK and Glenn.  I mean HOLY SHIT!!!!!!  Just stop and think for a minute how true has the song "Electric Eye" become.  Listening to this probably 25 to 30 years later and the music still stands up to stuff being released today.
     Every heavy metal fan has their favorite Judas Priest song or album.  However, every rock fan in the world knows track 8 "You've Got Another Thing Coming" even if you're not into metal  you know track 8!