Keel – ‘The Streets Of Rock And Roll’  

THE BAND:
Ron Keel – Vocals
Marc Ferrari – Guitar
Bryan Jay – Guitar
Geno Arce – Bass
Dwain Miller – Drums


TRACK FRAGMENTS:
1.) “Streets Of Rock & Roll” –This track opens with a pre-intro consisting of a rhythm guitar riff over the top drum line.  There is a bass note on every third bass drum kick.  After the first measure there is a lead vocal accent.  There is a Ron Keel lead vocal accent that connects the pre-intro with the intro.  There is a minor lead guitar solo over the top of the main intro arrangement.  For the musical verse Dwain switched from using the standard snare crack to a crossed stick pattern. (Causes a wood block sound) There is a rhythm change for the musical.  I also believe the band changed the timing.  For the musical verse both Marc & Bryan are playing the same rhythm riff.  There is a very cool rhythm change leading into the musical chorus.  The chorus was very short.  After the first chorus the arrangement is basically repeated up to the lead guitar solo after the second chorus.  The lead guitar solo runs underneath the opening of the third chorus.  There is a minor lead guitar solo that runs underneath the fourth and fifth chorus and through the outro.
2.) “Hit The Ground Running” –This track opens with two measures of a single rhythm guitar riff.  Then the main musical intro consisted of two measures with the full band.  For the main intro there was a rhythm guitar change.  There is a minor lead guitar solo over the top of the main musical intro.  The guys double-tracked the minor lead guitar solo.  This gives the effect of three different guitarists and causes the main intro to have a very heavy sound to it.  The rhythm guitar change for the musical verse had a very simple feel to it.  Ron’s vocal accents on the verse sound as if he is singing through gritted teeth.  This effect causes the vocal lines to have a very intense feel.  This s very reminiscent to the way Dee Snider of Twisted Sister sang pre- ‘Stay hungry’.  There is a small drum fill connecting the musical verse with the musical chorus.  The band changes the musical arrangement for the musical verse.  The backing vocals for the chorus of this song are very simple yet huge sounding.  The major lead guitar solo is after the third chorus.  The lead guitar solo leads into a musical breakdown section.  For the breakdown the band incorporate an acoustic guitar arrangement.  Ron’s vocal lines over the top of the breakdown were spoken instead of sung.  He also used a studio effect for the lyric lines.  There is a small lyric line connecting the breakdown with the fourth chorus.  This one connecting vocal line proves just how underrated Ron was as a vocalist back in the early eighties.  There is a minor lead guitar solo that runs underneath the last two choruses of the outro.
3.) “Come Hell Or High Water” –There is a minor lead guitar solo over the top of this intro arrangement.  The way the minor solo was written has it divided into two solos with a lead vocal in between.  The musical verse consisted of a music arrangement change.   The way the musical verse was arranged consisted of a drum line being the only thing underneath Ron’s vocals.  The rhythm guitar riffs are in between the lyric lines.  There is a rhythm change for the musical pre-chorus.  There is a lead guitar lick in between the first lyric line and second lyric line of the chorus.  There is a second minor lead guitar solo connecting the first chorus with the second verse.  It is not until the second verse when I happened to notice the bass line and though it’s very simple it made the verse.  The choruses of this song the guys pulled back to the eighties hard rock genre for influence.  The lead guitar solo is after the second chorus.  The solo is a twin lead guitar solo with several of the lead notes being the same notes as the rhythm.  There is a one measure rhythm change connecting the lead guitar solo with the third chorus.  Over the top of the outro there are several lead guitar notes.  There is not enough of these notes to warrant it being called a solo.
4.) “Push & Pull” – This intro opens with a couple of measures consisting of two different guitar rhythms.  The lead guitar is playing a electric picking/strumming pattern, the rhythm guitar is playing whole notes.  This second guitar sounds like it was being played with a reverbed effect.  There is a small vocal effect connecting this pre-intro with the main musical intro.  For the main intro both lead and rhythm guitar switch to playing the same rhythm.  This main rhythm had a huge hook attached to it.  There was a double-tracked minor twin lead guitar solo over the top of the main intro leading into the musical verse.  There is a tremolo effect to lead into the musical verse.  This minor twin lead guitar solo ranks up there with some of the best I’ve ever heard.  The lyrical, vocal, and musical verse had a huge hook attached to it.  There was a small arrangement change for the musical pre-chorus however; the way the song was written if you’re not paying attention you will miss it.  There is a small effect connecting the first chorus with the second verse.  To separate the first verse from the second Ron double-tracked I think two lyric lines.  The band changed the first measure after the second chorus leading into the lead guitar solo.  The lead guitar solo was a twin lead guitar solo.  There is a minor lead guitar solo that runs underneath the last two choruses of the outro. 
5.) “Does Anybody Believe” – This ballad opens with an acoustic guitar arrangement.  There is a short musical rest connecting the musical intro with the musical verse.  The acoustic guitar arrangement changes for the musical verse.  For the pre-chorus Dwain begins playing a tambourine.  The drum & bass line does not kick-in until the musical chorus.  It is also at this time an electric guitar arrangement kicks-in to give the music a more full sound.  The lead guitar solo is after the first chorus.  The major lead guitar solo connects the second and third choruses together.  The solo itself sounded like it was played by both Marc & Bryan.     
6.) “No More Lonely Nights” – For this intro you have both Marc & Bryan playing the same riff but at two different times.  The guys let the last note carry while the other one is playing the riff.  There is a twin minor lead guitar solo over the top of the last two measures of the intro leading into the musical verse.  Though the rhythm guitar changes for the musical verse they way Marc & Bryan play stays the same.  Ron’s vocals are fuckin’ amazing on this track!!!!  The last vocal of each lyric line was echoed.  There is a small musical rest that consisted of a lead vocal line connecting the verse with the chorus.  As an engineer I loved the way the guitar tracks were recorded on this track!!!  The chorus had a huge hook attached to it.   The lead guitar solo connects the second and third choruses.  The lead guitar solo was arranged as one seamless piece of music and written….
thinking….starting out with one guitarist then a few twin lead guitars solo notes then the second Keel guitarist finishes.  It’s not that the solo is the greatest guitar solo of all time it is the way it was arranged that makes it so damn cool.
7.) “The Devil May Care (But I Don’t)” – This intro opens with a rhythm guitar riff coming out of the left speaker, then after a small musical rest the riff repeats itself.  Then after another rest the same thing is repeated out of the right speaker. For the third time around there the guitar riff comes out of both speakers in stereo.  Underneath this Dwain basically keeps time with his hi-hat.  There are four stereo guitar riffs.  As these stereo riffs progress Dwain goes from playing quarter-notes (1, 2, 3, 4) to eighth notes (1+2+3+4+).  At this point Dwain also speeds the hi-hat timing up.  To signify this Ron sings a lyric line.  This lyric line was echoed.  There is a small lead guitar riff to connect the intro with the musical verse.  The musical verse consisted of a very huge hook.  I loved the way Ron sang the lyric lines of the lyrical verse.  There is a small arrangement change for the chorus.  There is a minor lead guitar solo connecting the first chorus with the second verse.  The major solo is after the second chorus.  One guitarist starts the solo and the second guitarist ends it.  There are several lead guitar notes that overlap making those notes a twin lead guitar solo.      
8.) “Lookin’ For A Good Time” – Both Marc & Byran are playing the rhythm guitar arrangement over top of the intro.  Because it is two guitar rhythms the guitar tracks of the intro automatically have a very heavy sound to it.   Over the top of the intro arrangement the guitarists overdubbed a twin lead guitar solo.  There is an arrangement change for the musical verse.  The first two lyrics of the last lyric line for the verse Ron either overdubbed the vocal or one of the other band members sang a backing harmony.  Either way it gives this last lyric line a very thick sound.  After the verse there is one lyric line with a backing harmony.  Since it is just one lyric line it does not really constitute a pre-chorus.  The chorus had a huge eighties hard rock hook attached to it.  After the second chorus there is a lead guitar solo.  This lead guitar solo is very short.  Though it opens with one guitarist it ends with two.  After the lead guitar solo there is a breakdown section.  For this breakdown section the band drop the electric guitar rhythm for an amplified acoustic guitar.  Dwain changes his drum line for the breakdown from a standard drum rhythm to a tom-tom pattern.  This tom-tom pattern is a classic eighties hard rock breakdown pattern.  The breakdown leads to the last chorus over the outro section.
9.) “Gimmie That” – This track opens with a fairly basic intro section.  There is a couple minor lead guitar licks underneath a lead vocal accent connecting the intro with the opening chorus.  The rhythm guitar of the opening chorus is mainly playing half-notes.  With the bars of music there are measures where the rhythm guitar rests causes Dwain’s drum rhythm to be the main focus.  Over the top of these sections the title lyrics “Gimme That” are sang using a talk box effect.  After what would be I guess the second chorus there was a minor lead guitar solo.  The major solo is after the fourth chorus and is played by both guitarists.  It sounds to me lyrically the entire song is one great big chorus.
10.) “Hold Steady” – This track opens with the special effect of a helicopter. The way the musical intro opening was recorded begins with the first rhythm coming out of only the right speaker.  As this riff trails off a second rhythm guitar riff comes out of the left speaker.  This riff is a different riff than the one coming out of the right speaker.  Same as the first riff as this one trails off the right one kicks-in.  On the third time through there is a minor lead guitar solo.  There is a couple minor lead guitar licks connecting the intro with the musical verse.  I do not have the linear notes and I will find out to make sure this is right however, I don’t not believe that Ron is singing this opening pre-verse.  If he his then he is one hell of a better vocalist then I ever gave him credit for.  There are several minor lead guitar licks underneath the lead vocal lines.  The vocal lines of the verse where double-tracked.  When the chorus kicks-in the vocals sound more like Ron.  There is a small arrangement change for the musical chorus.   There is a huge timing change underneath the lead guitar solo.  For the short breakdown the band added effects of a helicopter and a gun going off several times. 
11.) “Live” –Dwain counts this song off.  There are a couple different rhythm riffs before the main musical intro.  Of the two or three different riffs of the pre-intro it is the first one the band use as the main intro riff.  There is a small musical rest connecting the intro with the musical pre-verse.  There is an arrangement change for the musical pre-verse.  There are a couple of the lyrics that where double-tracked on the lyrical verse.  Dwain swapped his hi-hat out for a cowbell on the musical pre-verse.  The chorus had a huge hook attached to it.  Of all the songs on the release this one is more reminiscent of Ron’s country band Iron Horse. 
12.) “Brothers In Blood” – This intro consisted of an electric guitar arrangement over the top of an acoustic guitar arrangement.  Leading intro the minor lead guitar solo both acoustic & electric guitar play the same riff.  There is a rhythm guitar change for the musical verse.  The musical verse consisted of only an electric guitar however the band reincorporated the acoustic for the pre-chorus.  For the musical chorus Dwain switched from a standard hi-hat pattern to a tom-tom pattern.  For the second verse the band incorporated an underling acoustic guitar to fill-in the empty spaces of the electric guitar.  After the second chorus there is a small major twin lead guitar solo.  There are several minor lead guitar licks that lead into a minor lead guitar solo for the outro section.



     The line-up on the ‘The Streets of Rock’ is first time this line-up has recorded a studio album since 1998.  If you totaled up all of the Keel releases they do not equal up to this one!  The band has just set the bar for 2010!!!  This is a must buy!!!