Grimmstine – Self-Titled

Released In 2008
http://www.myspace.com/grimmstine

 THE BAND:
Steve Grimmett – vocals
Steve Stine – guitars
Hat – bass
Dave Johnson – drums



TRACK FRAGMENTS: 
1.) “Memory” -Instrumental
2.) “911” – This intro consisted of a lead guitar rhythm over the top of the main musical intro arrangement.  However, with that being said the intro was produced in such a way to where you can barely hear the lead rhythm.  There is a small lead lick and drum fill connecting the intro with the musical verse.  Steve’s vocally sounded as good as he did back in the early eighties.  There is a small musical change for I guess what you would call the pre-chorus.  This pre-chorus consisted of a spoken vocal section over the top of a musical arrangement.  This musical arrangement consisted of a laid back heavy meat rhythm riff over the top of a double-bass drum line.   The chorus consisted of a huge vocal & musical hook.  After the chorus the music arrangement repeats itself starting at the musical intro.  There is a small breakdown section after the second chorus that leads into a blistering lead guitar solo.  The double-bass drum work on this track is amazing!!!!
3.) “Supernatural” – This track opens with a single rhythm guitar riff.  About two measures into this single rhythm there is a musical rest then a one measure drum solo.  After this drum solo is when the main intro kicks in.  The main musical intro consists of two different rhythm guitar riffs.  The lead riff is mainly playing lead licks instead of a rhythm.  There is a small rhythm guitar change for the musical verse.  There are backing harmony sections underneath Steve’s lead vocal lines of the pre-chorus.  There is a small minor solo type rhythm in between the lead vocals and musical arrangement of the chorus.  The lead guitar solo connects the second chorus with the third chorus.   For the outro Dave changes the bass drum pattern a little.  This alone changes the dynamics of the outro.
4.) “Got Nothing But Time”
 - This intro consisted of mainly bass & drums with the rhythm guitar playing one simple riff here and there.  The main intro kicks-in with one of the coolest riffs I think I’ve ever heard.  This main musical intro had a very intense speed metal sound to it.  This is the same rhythm arrangement the band also used for the musical verse and I believe chorus.  There is a drastic musical change for the breakdown section. As the song progresses through the outro the music speeds up. If there was a guitar solo which, I’m sure there was it was either very short, or the music was so intense that the solo was unnoticeable.        
5.) “To Catch A Killer” – There is a lead guitar solo over the top of this intro section.  There are times when it sounds as if the minor solo was double tracked to give it a twin solo feel.  After listening to it again it sounded as if the rhythm guitar underneath the lead guitar is causes the lead to have a twin effect.  There is a rhythm arrangement change for the musical verse.  Steve’s lead vocals through the verse had an echo attached to them.  There is an arrangement change for the musical chorus.  After the first chorus there is a lead guitar section.  The way the Steve recorded his vocals for the verses & choruses had the echoes overlapping the actual lyric lines.  This was a very cool idea and up to this point made the song.  For the third chorus there was a musical change this musical change lead into the major lead guitar solo.  Through the arrangement does not actually change for the outro the bass drum pattern does which causes the arrangement to sound like it is changing. There also is a minor lead guitar solo over the top of the outro section.  
6.) “You’ll Never Know” – This track opens with an acoustic guitar arrangement over the top of several cymbal crashes.  Over the top of the acoustic guitar rhythm there is a minor acoustic lead guitar solo.  For the musical verse the arrangement drops the acoustical solo for a minor lead guitar solo.  Words cannot describe Steve vocals!  The last lyric line of the verse was double tracked.  The musical chorus of the song is where the music arrangement changes.  After the first chorus there is a lead guitar solo connecting it to the next verse.  There is a small breakdown section leading into the major lea guitar solo.  This track is worth every second of its length.  
7.) “It’s Over” – This intro consisted of a single minor lead guitar solo.  The minor lead guitar solo runs underneath the lead vocals of the pre-verse.  There is a small pick slide leading into the musical verse.  The minor solo riff of the intro continues through the musical verse.  It does not stop until the musical chorus.  Everything about this track is amazing!!!!!After the second chorus the lead solo riff that opened the track was double tracked.  The lead guitar solo was written in a classic eighties metal style.  All in this entire track was very short and simple.
8.) “Prisoner” – The intro to this track consists of a very simple heavy metal intro section.  Connecting the intro section with the musical verse Steve double tracked a lead guitar rhythm over the top of the musical arrangement.  For the opening lyric line and through the verse Steve switched from a distorted rhythm guitar arrangement to a clean electric guitar arrangement.  After hearing Steve’s heavy vocal lines it is hard to believe that this is him singing.  Steve kicked back in the distorted rhythm guitar for the musical verse.  This gives the track a very European metal sound.  There is a huge snare fill connecting the first chorus with the second verse.  Steve Stine double tracked several guitar riffs on this song which causes it to have a very heavy sound.  After the second chorus there is a small breakdown section that leads into the lead guitar solo.  Though the guitar solo was a couple of notes repeated several times it still was cool as hell.
9.) “You Give Me Love” – This intro consisted of two different rhythm guitar riffs.  There is a small drum fill that leads to the main musical intro.  This intro consisted of a minor lead guitar solo.  The musical change for this second intro was a lot more intense than the first.  The band switched back to the first intro arrangement for the musical verse.  There is a small pick slide leading into the musical chorus.  The musical chorus had a drastic musical change.  The way the guys arranged the phrases both musically and lyrically gives the song a progressive metal sound.  The solo was laid back and suited the song very well.  
10.) “Straight As An Arrow” – WHAT A SONG!!!!!!!
11.) “’Till They Take My Wings” – This is one of those songs that a band writes that comes right out of left field.  It is just pure magic!
12.) “Take This Air” – This track opens with a simple rhythm guitar riff.  The intro kicks-in with a huge drum fill.  There are two different rhythm guitar arrangements over the top of the drum & bass line of the intro.  There are several drum fills and double bass drum licks for the musical verse.  The musical verse had a progressive metal feel to it.  The song is almost on the verge of being very melodic with a great hook however it does not quite make it.  For me it was the worst on the CD and with there being fifteen tracks I would have probably left this one off of the release.  The only highlight musically was the solo. 
13.) “Afraid Of The Dark” – All in all outside of the lead guitar licks that are laced within the guitar rhythm this is a typical heavy metal song.  
14.) “This Don’t Look Like Love To Me” – The intro to this track opens with a very simple rhythm guitar riff over the top of a bass and drum line.  The minor lead guitar solo that is over the top of the intro was heavily reminiscent of UFO’s Vinnie Moore.  There is a small musical rest and drum fill connecting the intro with the musical verse.  The musical verse consisted of two different rhythm guitar arrangements.  There is a huge pick slide leading into the musical chorus.  There is a minor lead guitar solo connecting the first chorus with the second verse.  The song really does not have a major lead guitar solo.
15.) “To Sing A Lullabye (Jimmy’s Song)” – This track was very reminiscent of American seventies one-hit wonder bands.



             The first time I heard the name Steve Grimmett was when he was with the band Grim Reaper.  I heard that name once and that was in an article written in either, Hit Parader, Metal Edge, Faces or Circus magazine, can’t remember which one now.  Either way that’s not the point the point is not long after I read the article I saw their video for “See You In Hell” from their 1984 album by the same name.  I saw it on a heavy metal program the USA Network use to show. (If anyone within the United States remembers the name of this program please send me an email.)  Not long after seeing the video I had a friend of mine order the release.  Still to this day it dumbfounds me why Grim Reaper did not make it within the United States.  Over the years every point I make for the band not making it, I make a point for the band making it.  That’s the good ole American Music Industry.  However it doesn’t matter how many you points make there is one point that stands true with Grim Reaper as with GrimmStine, Steve Grimmett is one of the best metal vocalists of all-time!  So as far as the vocals go I knew they were going to be taken care of.  My concern was with the band because to my knowledge it was with a set of unknown musicians backing him up. The self-titled release opens with “Memory” an instrumental.  The tuning Steve Stine used plus the way he arranged the notes reminded me of Jim Croce acoustic arrangement on “Time In A Bottle”.  For the most part the heavier songs such as “Supernatural”, “To Catch A Killer” and “Afraid Of The Dark” are mixtures of modern British metal, progressive metal with a little modern Grim Reaper thrown in.  However, coming from a musician’s standpoint it is the ballads that make this release.  If you are a fan of modern progressive metal, metal with a classical music influence or Grim Reaper than this CD is for you.