Sainted & Sinners – ‘Back With A Vengeance’


THE BAND:
Frank Pané - guitar
David Reece - vocals
Berci Hirleman - drums
Malte Frederik Burkert - bass
Ferdy Doernberg - guitar

 

 

 

TRACK FRAGMENTS:
1.) “Rise Like A Phoenix” – The song opens with a pre-intro that consisted of a minor lead guitar solo.  About seventeen seconds into the lead guitar solo a second lead guitar kicks in underneath the first lead guitar solo.  This second lead guitar solo played the same notes as the main guitar solo.  The only difference that I heard was that the second solo was just a little higher pitched than the first one was.  After the solos the guitar arrangement changes to a single rhythm guitar playing a very simple speeded-up rhythm guitar riff.  After the riff is played three times Berci kicks the drum line-in. After three measures a minor lead guitar solo kicks-in over the top of the main musical intro.  The last note of the minor solo was a half-note which connected the musical intro with the musical verse.  The musical verse consisted of a rhythm guitar change.  There was a snare drum fill connecting the third and fourth lyric lines.  The vocals of the fourth lyric line was double-tracked.  The vocals of the fourth lyric line was double-tracked.  Then on the sixth lyric line the last two lyrics where also double-tracks.  Underneath the last lyric line of the verse there was a drum fill.  After the last lyric line of the verse there was a rhythm change for the pre-chorus.  After the first lyric line of the pre-chorus thee was a small lead guitar rhythm/minor solo.  There were a few lead guitar licks connecting the musical pre-chorus and the chorus.  There was a rhythm arrangement change for the musical chorus.  The lyrical and musical hook of the chorus consisted of not only a huge hook however also a very sweet one as well.  I just fell in love with the chorus of this song.  There was a drum fill along with a minor lead guitar solo to connect the first chorus with the second verse.  There was no pre-chorus before the second chorus.  For the second chorus Berci added a few tom-tom licks to the drum line.  After the second chorus there was a musical change.  This musical change consisted of the band slowing the musical arrangement down.  There was a vocal accent along with two lyric lines.  This lead to a major lead guitar solo.  The lead guitar solo the guys wrote for this track was perfect!  The solo lead to a third chorus.  There was a minor lead guitar solo underneath the fourth chorus.  After the fifth chorus there was a second lead guitar solo.  This second solo was more laid back and melodic than the first lead guitar solo.  This solo also runs over the top of the coda.
2.) “Burnin’ The Candle” -This intro consisted of a lead guitar rhythm over the top of a few cymbal crashes and tom-tom strokes.  As the intro progressed Berci kept adding more and more snare/tom-tom fills to the drum line.  Over the top of the intro David sings a vocal accent that consisted of a vocal scream at the end of the vocal scream David sings/screams the word “yeah”.  There was a minor lead guitar solo that connected the musical intro withy the musical verse.  There was a music arrangement change for the musical verse.  The musical verse consisted of two different rhythm guitar arrangements one on top of the other.  For me, I thought the musical intro along with the two rhythm guitar arrangements of the musical verse consisted of a very nice musical hook.  There was a blistering minor lead guitar solo that lead into the opening lyric line.  I highly praise David and Frank for writing the lyric lines such as they did.  Writing the lyric lines with such huge hooks shows the songwriting ability of David Reece (formerly of Accept) and guitarist Frank Pané (formerly of Bonfire).  There was a minor lead guitar solo that connected the musical verse with the musical pre-chorus.  The rhythm guitar along with the lyrical hook of the pre-chorus and chorus was marvelous.  There was a minor lead guitar solo connecting the second pre-chorus with the second chorus.  There was a rhythm arrangement over the top several snare drum/tom-tom fills.  After the third chorus there was three leading into the main lead guitar solo there was several lead guitar licks over the top of several drum fills.  The actual main lead guitar solo consisted of just great guitar techniques such as finger tapping and hammer on’s from beginning to end.  After the lead guitar solo there was a short musical break before a second lead guitar solo kicked in.  This musical break consisted of two different rhythm guitar arrangements.  Though this was just the second half of the first solo with a musical break in between.  It was just as intense as the first half.  The bass line underneath the lead guitar solo was very simple yet suited the solo very nice.  After the solo there was a pre-chorus then chorus.  After the chorus the coda consisted of a chorus and then minor solo.
3.) “Back With A Vengeance” – This intro opens with just David singing a lyric line. “Time ain’t on my side, it’s time I go for awhile”.  It sounded as if this lyric line was double-tracked.  The guitar arrangement of the intro opens with a tremolo bar effect before going into the main guitar rhythm. The minor lead guitar solo was heavily influence by late seventies Eddie Van Halen.  Underneath the minor lead guitar solo of the intro the drum line consisted of a snare/tom-tom pattern.  The minor solo of the intro consisted of a hammer-on solo.  The rest of the intro consisted of a rhythm guitar arrangement that had lead guitar notes mixed in with it.  During this part of the intro the drum line consisted of a standard hi-hat drum pattern.  There was a snare drum fill underneath the rhythm guitar that connected the musical intro with the musical verse.  The rhythm guitar of the musical verse was a very simple sounding arrangement.  The drum line of the musical verse consisted of a snare drum pattern.  There was a rhythm change for the musical chorus.  For the musical chorus the way the band wrote the musical change along with the music itself gave the song a heavier sound.  In the middle of the intro there was a short musical rest that consisted of three snare cracks.  The first part of the second verse leads with a spoken lyric line where Daid says, “hahaha, I can’ wait to see the look on you face”.  The arrangement of the second verse and chorus was the same as the first. Leading into the major lead guitar solo there was a section of music where the lead guitar and bass played the same lead notes.  The solo started and at first because David starts singing you think it is just going to be a minor lead guitar solo however after David sings one lyric line the rest of the major solo kicks in.  This lead guitar solo was just as intense as the rest of the solos on the release so far.  About halfway through the solo the lead guitar stops and a bass solo begins.  I absolutely was not expecting this!  After the bass solo the lead guitar solo kicks back in.  The rest of the song was a repeated chorus.
4.) “Tell Me I was Wrong” – This was an amazing semi-ballad.  My favorite part of the song was the minor solo of the intro. Along with the sound of the lead guitar itself.
5.) “Nothin’ Left to Lose” -  This intro opened with just a rhythm guitar.  The notes of this rhythm guitar arrangement had a very Seventies feel to it.  The full band kicked in for the main intro section.  There was a snare drum fill underneath the music arrangement that leaded into the musical intro.  There was a rhythm guitar change for the musical verse.  David carried out the last notes of some of the lyric lines.  Underneath the third rhythm guitar of the third lyric line the band added another instrument to the arrangement.  I don’t have the linear notes so it is very hard to tell what this added instrument was.  There was a drum fill connecting the verse with the chorus.  The last lyric line of the chorus consisted of a backing vocal.  Between the first and second then the third and forth lyric lines of the second verse there were two drum fills.  After the second chorus there was a twin lead guitar section where both guitarist played the same lead licks.  After the second chorus the band changed the timing of the song slowing it down quite a bit.  Underneath the twin lead guitar solo one of the guitarist overdubbed an acoustic guitar rhythm.  The lead guitar solos of this song made the track.  Though the song shows the versatility that David and Frank have as songwriters when you compare this track to the previous four it doesn’t fit.  The lead guitar solo was strange as Hell.  There was a snare/tom-tom fill connecting the lead guitar solo with the third verse.
6.) “Waitin’ Till The Countdown Begins” – This intro opens with a single rhythm guitar riff that was played with what sound like some type of wah-way effect.  The guitar effect that was used Jimmy Page used a lot so the opening rhythm had a Jimmy Page sound to it.  At the end of the guitar rhythm where two single strums then the guitarist turned the guitar up and dropped the effect.  It was at this point of the musical intro that the there was a rhythm guitar change.  Underneath this section there was three different drum fills before the actual drum line kicked in.  For the drum line of the intro Berci used his ride cymbal instead of his hi-hat.  There was a minor lead guitar solo connecting the intro to the musical verse.  The intro consisted of a huge musical hook.  The musical verse consisted of just one guitar and was basically the same rhythm as the intro with just a few minor changes.  Underneath the rhythm guitar there was a very minor keyboard arrangement.  The keyboard actually wasn’t needed and served no real purpose within the musical verse.  In between the fourth and fifth lyric lines of the first verse there was a snare drum fill.  There was a rhythm guitar change connecting the verse and the chorus.  The chorus had a very nice hook.  There was very nice hook for the musical chorus.  After the second chorus there was kind of breakdown section that lead to both guitarist playing a lead guitar solo.  Underneath the lead vocals of the third chorus there was a backing harmony.  This song was one of the few songs on the disc that actually had a backing vocal.  Over the top of the coda there was a major lead guitar solo.
7.) “Let It Go” – This song was not only amazing however it show just hoew great of a vocalist David Reese is!
8.) “When The Hammer Falls” -This track opens with a very quick drum fill before the rhythm guitar kicked in.  The rhythm guitar of the intro consisted of a very sweet hook.  The way the wrote the drum line and the rhythm guitar caused the two arrangements to fit perfectly.  There was a rhythm guitar change for the musical verse.  The way the intro and the verse were musical arranged along with the way David arranged the lyrics reminded me a lot of the stuff off of Badlands first CD.  For the musical verse Berci switched to an opening and closing hi-hat pattern.  He switched back to a standard hi-hat pattern for the musical chorus.  After the second chorus there was a twin lead guitar rhythm that lead to the lead guitar solo. In the middle of the solo section there was a back and forth between lead vocals and the backing vocals.  This was something I had never heard in the middle of a solo section.
9.) “Pretty Little Lies” – This was another song on the release that just consisted of amazing songwriting!
10.) “Gone But Not Forgotten” – As a former musician I judst loved the way this semi-ballad was arranged.